Weaving Bridges Project 2016

Building on the success of the Weaving Bridges Project since 2013, Manly Environment Centre, Manly Community Centre, Northern Beaches Aboriginal Community members, Northern Beaches Council and Sanctuary Respite Centre, North Head, joined together for an exciting new weaving project in 2016 – using the theme from the Guringai Festival ‘Through My Eyes’ along with this year’s NAIDOC Week theme of ‘Songlines’.

The theme we chose this year was inspired by our native flowers which represent the bush and country along which ‘Songlines’ travelled. Each piece was individually woventhrough my eyes’, with work by more than 150 participants in this year’s Weaving Brides Project.

The project culminated with installation of the woven art works on the Queenscliff Lagoon bridge and a launch attended by more than 100 people.

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Join us to celebrate the launch of SONGLINES - this year's Weaving Bridges Project as your gorgeous artworks are unveiled on Queenscliff lagoon's Stuart Somerville Bridge.

It's on Tuesday July 5 from 10.30 to 12.30pm.  

 

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A NAIDOC Week event

Launch of the Weaving Bridges Project 2016

A Celebration of 16th Guringai Festival – ‘Through My Eyes’

Northern Beaches Council , Manly Community Centre, Northern Beaches Aboriginal Community members, Northside Community Forum In, Sanctuary Respite Services, community groups, individuals as well as school children, have joined together to weave, knit and crochet artworks around the  theme of – ‘Through My Eyes’.

These artworks create a large textile ‘Songlines’ landscape for this year’s Weaving Bridges Project, which is to be installed on the Stuart Somerville Bridge, Queenscliff.

A NAIDOC  Week event, the Launch Ceremony includes guest speakers, a smoking ceremony, didgeridoo performance, entertainment and the unveiling of the installation. Morning tea will be served.

When:   Tues July 5

Where: Outside Queenscliff Surf Life Saving Club (inside if wet)

Launch: 10.30am – 12.30pm

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Smell something bad? Now it's easy to report sewerage odours from the North Head Treament Plant or its trucks.

sniffandsubmit.com

 

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GURINGAI FESTIVAL presents Weaving Bridges 2016

The Yarn to Yarn workshops have started but we're keeping a place for you. Please join us  
Manly Community Centre, 12 Wentworth St. Next to Manly Public School. 
Every Thursday throughout June from 12.30 to 2.30pm      

Then we display the artworks on Queenscliff Lagoon Bridge with the
Project Launch at Queenscliff Surf Club on Tues July 5 at 10.30am 


Weaving Bridges Project 2016

Building on from the success of the Weaving Bridges Projects since 2013 - join the Manly Environment Centre, Manly Community Centre, Northern Beaches Aboriginal Community members and Warringah Council for an exciting new weaving project – Through My Eyes incorporating the  NAIDOC theme of Songlines. This year specifically we are looking for youth involvement in the project.

Individuals, community groups and schools are invited to participate in Yarn to Yarn workshops collaborating towards a large scale art installation. Enjoy a laugh and a yarn with a member of the Aboriginal community at the same time. 

We need lots of helping hands for this project. Join us and bring your friends.
Schools please make contact to be involved. Like us on facebook to find workshops in your area. 
facebook.com/Weavingbridgesproject

 

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Sydney-siders used to be terrified of sharks, thinking man-eating monsters lurked behind every wave. Now most people realise that not only are shark attacks very rare, but these magnificent creatures have a crucial role to play in keeping our oceans healthy.

One of the people responsible for this huge shift in public opinion is Balgowlah resident Sharni Connell.

Last night (March 17) she was named Manly's Eco Hero for 2016,

The ceremony, which is run by Manly Environment Centre, was held in the stunning surrounds of Manly's Sea Life Sanctuary and took place one day after the environment centre's 25th anniversary.

Ms Connell won from a field of 23 contestants who had each been nominated for their outstanding contribution to Manly's environment.

“We have to find a way to share the ocean safely without killing sharks or other marine animals, " Ms Connell said.  "No matter how how difficult it is we have to keep protesting, because there is no Planet B."

Ms Connell has conducted her own research on controversial shark protection methods such as shark nets, which are now known to kill vast numbers of "non-target" species, as well as sharks.

She has organised hugely successful public rallies and spoken to many community groups and government bodies including Manly Council and Premier and local MP Mike Baird.

She was a key player in organising a high powered Shark Summit late last year. As a direct result real progress has been made with a trial now in place of non-lethal shark protection methods such as "smart buoys" with sonar detection systems, plastic barriers, drone technology and community education.

She is also the chair of the Australia-wide group No Shark Cull.

Ms Connell received an original painting from local artist Mark Budd. It's of Manly"s treasured Marine Sanctuary at Cabbage Tree Bay and there's a shark right in the middle of it.

Thanks to Brendan Donohoe, from the Surfrider Foundation, who spoke of the rising tide of environmental awareness in communities like ours; and everyone who came along to make the night so much fun.

 

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The MEC Eco Awards are on next month. 

It's the 11th year of  this important event, which is becoming more and more popular.

We're looking for an ordinary person doing extraordinary things for Manly’s environment.

If you know someone who deserves to be recognised - a friend, family member, colleague, neighbour or volunteer - please let us know. 

The award is open to people over 18, from all walks of life. They don't need to be living in Manly, but their work must be relevant to conservation of the environment in the Manly Council area.

Both you and your nominee will be invited to the Eco Awards ceremony to be held in Manly next month. 

And the winner will receive an original artwork by a local artist and valuable community acknowledgement.

Nominate your Unsung Hero in 3 easy steps:-

  1. Download a nomination form here
  2. Complete your nominee’s details
  3. Drop off or post to Manly Environment Centre at 41 Belgrave St, Manly NSW 2095 or email to mec@manly.nsw.gov.au

Nominations for Manly's next Unsung Hero close on Friday March 4.

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 Sydney has one of the most remarkable marine environments of any big city in the world. The harbour is a drowned valley, which until 10,000 years ago was inhabited by aborigines.  As a result it has a huge range of different habitats -  seagrasses, rocky reefs, kelp beds, boulder fields, sponge gardens and more - and a correspondingly spectacular array of marine life. 

Sydney harbour has almost 600 species of fish, more than double the number of species found in all the seas around the British Isles.  They include crimson banded wrasse, eastern blue groper, Tasmanian chromodorid, giant cuttlefish, moon wrasse, unicornfish, moorish idols, butterfly fish and splendid nudibranch.

A Marine Park for Sydney would extend beyond the harbour to include the entire Sydney coastline and all our ocean beaches and would be equivalent of an underwater national park. It wouldn't be the complete protection that has made Cabbage Tree Aquatic Reserve such a success, but it would be a great start. 

Our Ocean Care Day Festival last year focussed on Sydney Marine Park, with the keynote presentation from  diver and marine campaigner John Turnbull gave - on why our city deserves the protection a marine park affords. 

More at sydneymarinepark.org.au

Images: John Turnbull was the keynote speaker; proposed Sydney Marine park stretcing from Pittwater to Port Hacking; the MEC Ocean Lab with huge map of Sydney Harbour and relevant fish species on the back wall. 

John Turnbull

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Big crowds and beautiful weather made the 22nd Manly Ocean Care Day the best festival yet. 

The fun started with marching band Bateria61 leading a marine parade of aquatic creatures, onlookers and Manly's own Plastic Princess. 

There was a Welcome to Country and a smoking ceremony before diver and marine campaigner John Turnbull gave the keynote speech - why Sydney needs a Marine Park. 

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There were dozens of great stalls, with the prize for Best Presented going to Two Hands Project. They won a fabulous trip on Sydney Harbour, generously donated by Eco Boats - the self-guided electric hire boat company. 

Stalls pictured include the National Parks Association, Friends of Cabbage Tree Bay, the MEC tent and Two Hands Project and their "plastic princess", with a dress made from thrown-away plastic bags. 

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And it wasn't just stalls.  A stunning wooden whale sculpture by Michael Greves rested in pride of place at the entrance to the festival. And on the beach behind, a beautiful seahorse and turtle gradually took shape in the sand. 

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We had a huge program of music, talks and art.


Pictured L to R, and top to bottom: Abuka duo, Brendan Donohoe from Northern Beaches Surfrider Foundation, Taj Ralph, Sharnie Connell from No Shark Cull, Trent Williams, Fernando, artist Renata Bruynzeel with Manly’s Plastic Princess, artists Midori Furze and Tanya Murphy, music tent with bean bags, children working on Tanya’s marine masterpiece, Gemma Plesman from Sea Shepherd.

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GLIDE through the Cabbage Tree Bay underwater wonderland with this video from recent MEC intern Alex Robinson.  Alex uses his scuba diving skills to film a giant cuttlefish, stars and stripes spotted puffer, red morowong, white ears, blue gropers, Port Jackson sharks and many more. It's a beautiful world down there and the video will make you feel like diving in too. Alex said he made the film to showcase the immense biodiversity found at Cabbage Tree Bay Aquatic Reserve. Here - in order of appearance - is what he saw: Southern Maori Wrasse, Stars and Stripes Spotted Puffer, Eastern Blue Groper (Male), Rough Leatherjacket, Zoanthid, Rainbow Cale, White Ear, Mado, Yellow Tail Bream, Mullet, Crimson Banded Wrasse, Giant Cuttlefish, Red Morwong, Black Reef Leatherjacket, Rock Cale, Common Stingaree, Port Jackson Shark, Hula Fish, Eastern Blue Groper (Female), and a Juvenile Port Jackson Shark.

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On Sunday Manly turned out to celebrate all things environmental at our 22nd Manly Ocean Care Day Festival.

The festival, with the theme "Support a Sydney Marine Park", was a huge success with tens of thousands of people enjoying stalls, music, talks and art on Manly ocean beach front. 

The fun started with marching band Bateria61 leading a marine parade of aquatic creatures, onlookers and Manly's own Plastic Princess. 

There was a Welcome to Country and a smoking ceremony before diver and marine campaigner John Turnbull gave the keynote speech - on why our city deserves the protection a marine park affords.

Mr Turnbull said Sydney has one of the most remarkable marine environments of any big city in the world. The harbour is a drowned valley, which until 10,000 years ago was inhabited by aborigines.  As a result it has a huge range of different habitats -  seagrasses, rocky reefs, kelp beds, boulder fields, sponge gardens and more - and a correspondingly spectacular array of marine life. 

Sydney harbour has almost 600 species of fish, more than double the number of species found in all the seas around the British Isles.  They include crimson banded wrasse, eastern blue groper, Tasmanian chromodorid, giant cuttlefish, moon wrasse, unicornfish, moorish idols, butterfly fish and splendid nudibranch.

A Marine Park for Sydney would extend beyond the harbour to include the entire Sydney coastline and all our ocean beaches and would be equivalent of an underwater national park. It wouldn't be the complete protection that has made Cabbage Tree Aquatic Reserve such a success, but it would be a great start. 

Images: John Turnbull was the keynote speaker; proposed Sydney Marine park stretcing from Pittwater to Port Hacking; the MEC Ocean Lab with huge map of Sydney Harbour and relevant fish species on the back wall. 

 

John Turnbull

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